Students headed to MathCON competition

WINTERSVILLE — Success was part of the equation for two Indian Creek High School students who earned high scores during an online math assessment, and now they will advance to a national contest.

Juniors Keith Maple and Owen Price placed fourth and fifth, respectively, for the Midwest region after recently taking the test, which involved completing a series of algebra, geometry, pre-calculus and other questions within 45 minutes. They learned their results over the past few weeks and will head to the National MathCON 2017 Competition Finals in Chicago on April 22. Nearly 50,000 applicants from across 43 states took the online assessment, but only 576 qualified for MathCON.

Elementary and high school students took the assessment and competed across several mathematical disciplines, including algebra, geometry, pre-calculus, measurement, data analysis and number systems. ICHS teacher Barbara Turner learned of the online test through correspondence from Concept Schools, a New York-based education management company that hosts the competition.

“Both Owen and Keith are on the academic team and I encouraged the students to take the online test,” Turner said. “They answered 45 questions in 45 minutes and the top score was 320. They are in the top 1 percent.”

Turner said she was ecstatic to learn how well Maple and Price had done and that they surpassed students from both private and larger urban schools.

“They outscored the entire West Coast,” she added. “They will go to Chicago on April 22 and take a paper-based test at the University of Illinois in Chicago. This is the first time in this area that anyone has done the test.”

Maple, the son of Amy Cehrs of Wintersville, was excited about his achievement.

“I was pretty happy,” Maple said.

“I had no words,” added Price, the son of Jaime and Shawn Price of Wintersville.

Now in its ninth year, MathCON was created by Concept Schools as a Midwest competition with 125 participants, but it since has become a national event.

It is a daylong activity and participants could earn prizes and national prestige.

In addition to testing, students can view a math comedy show, pizza party and have a chance to play an array of S.T.E.M.-related games.

MathCON’s goal is to engage students in S.T.E.M. outside the classroom and encourage them to enter the S.T.E.M. fields.

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