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TODAY IN HISTORY

Today is the 292nd day of 2019. There are 73 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Oct. 19, 1987, the stock market crashed as the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged 508 points, or 22.6 percent in value (its biggest daily percentage loss), to close at 1,738.74 in what came to be known as “Black Monday.”

On this date:

In 1765, the Stamp Act Congress, meeting in New York, adopted a declaration of rights and liberties which the British Parliament ignored.

In 1781, British troops under Gen. Lord Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, Va.

In 1814, the first documented public performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner” took place at the Holliday Street Theater in Baltimore.

In 1944, the U.S. Navy began accepting black women into WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service).

In 1960, the United States began a limited embargo against Cuba covering all commodities except medical supplies and certain food products.

In 1977, the supersonic Concorde made its first landing in New York City.

In 1982, automaker John Z. DeLorean was arrested by federal agents in Los Angeles, accused of conspiring to sell $24 million of cocaine to salvage his business. (DeLorean was acquitted at trial on grounds of entrapment.)

In 2001, U.S. special forces began operations on the ground in Afghanistan.

In 2008, retired Gen. Colin Powell, a Republican who was President George W. Bush’s first secretary of state, broke with the party and endorsed Democrat Barack Obama for president.

Ten years ago: The Justice Department issued a new policy memo, telling prosecutors that pot-smoking patients or their sanctioned suppliers should not be targeted for federal prosecution in states that allowed medical marijuana. Actor Joseph Wiseman, 91, who played the sinister Dr. No in the first James Bond feature film, died in New York City. Mass killer Howard Unruh, who took 13 lives during a 1949 rampage in Camden, N.J., died in a Trenton nursing facility at age 88.

Five years ago: Pope Francis beatified Pope Paul VI, concluding a remarkable meeting of bishops debating family issues that drew parallels to the tumultuous reforms of the Second Vatican Council which Paul oversaw and implemented. An Associated Press investigation found that dozens of Nazis war criminals and SS guards had collected millions in U.S. Social Security pension payments after being forced out of the United States.

One year ago: In the first federal case alleging foreign interference in the 2018 midterm elections, U.S. authorities accused a Russian woman of helping oversee the finances of a sweeping effort to sway American public opinion through social media. On the same day, U.S. intelligence agencies asserted that Russia, China, Iran and other countries were engaged in continuous efforts to influence American policy and voters in the upcoming elections and beyond.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Tony Lo Bianco is 83. Artist Peter Max is 82. Author and critic Renata Adler is 82. Actor Michael Gambon is 79. Actor John Lithgow is 74. Feminist activist Patricia Ireland is 74. Singer Jeannie C. Riley is 74. Rock singer-musician Patrick Simmons (The Doobie Brothers) is 71. Actress Annie Golden is 68. Rock singer-musician Karl Wallinger (World Party) is 62. Singer Jennifer Holliday is 59. Retired boxer Evander Holyfield is 57. Host Ty Pennington (TV: “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition”) is 55. Rock singer-musician Todd Park Mohr (Big Head Todd and the Monsters) is 54. Actor Jon Favreau is 53. Amy Carter is 52. “South Park” co-creator Trey Parker is 50. Rock singer Pras Michel (The Fugees) is 47. Actor Omar Gooding is 43. Country singer Cyndi Thomson is 43. Actor Benjamin Salisbury is 39. Actress Gillian Jacobs is 37. Actress Rebecca Ferguson is 36.

Thought for Today: “Dream in a pragmatic way.” — Aldous Huxley, English author (1894-1963).

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